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Swing Analysis: Tom Weiskopf- 14 Years of Brilliance

Between 1968 and 1982 Tom Weiskopf won 16 PGA Tour events including the British Open in 1973, a year in which he won 7 times world wide and was ranked #2 in the world. Weiskopf came close to being remembered as one of the all-time greats, but suffered 4 runner-up finishes in the Masters and a runner-up and 4 top 4s in the U.S. Open. Just as players in the 2000’s had to deal with Tiger Woods, Weiskopf played in the shadow of Nicklaus and Watson, and by the mid-80’s had all but ceased to compete, not returning to competition until turning 50 in 1992 and playing the Senior Tour, where he won 4 times including the U.S. Senior Open in 1995. Weiskopf looks like a prototype for todays average Tour star, tall (6’3”), and lanky strong, hitting the ball longer and higher than most while exhibiting great control with his shorter clubs. We also see comparisons to today’s players as he utilized a full wind up backswing with his driver while keeping his iron swing much shorter. What stands out as a huge difference between Weiskopf’s technique and today’s swings is his large amount of lateral movement, both off the ball in the backswing and with his lower body in the forward swing. He, along with Nicklaus, Watson, and Johnny Miller (among others) finished his swing in a pronounced “reverse-C”, as his leg drive continued well past impact while he kept his head and upper body behind the ball. Other items of interest in his swing are his right forearm takeaway, his flat or even bowed left wrist and the top of his swing, and his “hands out” move in transition which kept the club nicely in front of him in the downswing.
 

 

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2 Responses to Swing Analysis: Tom Weiskopf- 14 Years of Brilliance

  1. Tom October 20, 2018 at 1:04 pm #

    One of the best moments in the Masters history occurred in 1986 when Weiskopf was on the CBS broadcasting team.

    One of the other commentators asked Weiskopf during the final round what was going through Nicklaus’ head as he was mounting his charge to win his sixth Masters.

    Weiskopf’s reply was a classic:

    “If I knew what was going through Jack Nicklaus’s head, I would have won the Masters.”

  2. Todd November 9, 2018 at 1:21 pm #

    great analysis. Thanks!

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